Explain The Good Friday Agreement

Issues of sovereignty, civil and cultural rights, weapons dismantling, demilitarization, justice and police work were at the heart of the agreement. The agreement set out a complex set of provisions relating to a number of areas, including the signing of the so-called Good Friday (or Belfast) Agreement on 10 April 1998. This agreement helped to put an end to a period of conflict in the region, described as unrest. Both views were recognized as legitimate. For the first time, the Irish Government has accepted, in a binding international agreement, that Northern Ireland should be part of the United Kingdom. [9] The Irish Constitution has also been amended to implicitly recognise Northern Ireland as part of the sovereign territory of the United Kingdom,[7] provided that a majority of the population of the island`s two jurisdictions accepts a united Ireland. On the other hand, the language of the agreement reflects a change in the legal emphasis placed by the United Kingdom from one for the Union to another for a united Ireland. [9] The agreement therefore left the question of future sovereignty over Northern Ireland indefinitely. [10] An agreement that can`t even agree on its own name – irony. Political parties in Northern Ireland, which endorsed the agreement, were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, with members of civil society with social, cultural, economic and other expertise, and appointed by both administrations.

In 2002, a framework for the North-South Consultation Forum was agreed, and in 2006 the Northern Ireland Executive agreed to support its establishment. During negotiations on the UK`s planned withdrawal from the European Union in 2019, the EU developed a position paper on its concerns about the UK`s support for the Good Friday Agreement during Brexit. The position paper covers, inter alia, the prevention of a hard border, North-South cooperation between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, the right to birth of all inhabitants of Northern Ireland (as provided for in the Agreement) and the common travel area. [31] [32] Anyone born in Northern Ireland who is therefore entitled to an Irish passport under the Good Friday Agreement can retain EU citizenship even after Brexit. [33] As part of the European Union`s Brexit negotiating directives, the UK has been asked to convince other member states that these issues have been addressed to move on to the second phase of Brexit negotiations. . . .