Impact Of Open Skies Agreement

If an open aviation zone is such a good idea, why didn`t Europe and the United States create one? Particularly because of the serious concern about the potential effects of international aviation liberalization in three key areas: U.S. national security (in particular the Civil Air Fleet Reserve, which offers commercial airlifts in the event of a military emergency); American workers (pilots claim they are being replaced by lower-paid EU colleagues on transatlantic flights); and aviation safety. Our study studies each problem area in detail. We conclude that open airspace between the EU and the US would maintain, if not improve, airline safety and US national security and that the harm to US airline workers would be limited. So why would you take care of it? Well, let`s first say an indication of caution. There are many open ski agreements and, even if it is, the impact on the entire air transport market is not expected to be huge. Moreover, there is no concrete word from the White House on this alleged decision and certainly nothing to confirm that the United States will abandon open skiing agreements. The benefits for consumers are obvious – open skiing agreements have helped liberalise the air traffic environment, resulting in much more choice, convenience and lower prices. Indeed, it is difficult to imagine that the extremely diverse and complex international air transport market exists without such open skies agreements. While existing open skiing agreements are generally fairly well received, some aspects of the treaties are still the subject of criticism. Allegations have been made that the laws concerned favour certain countries too much and that they do not adequately promote the level playing field they are supposed to create. Regardless of these criticisms, there is no doubt that open ski agreements have played an important role in the creation of the dynamic air transport market, which we often take for granted.

The United States has achieved open skis with more than 100 partners from all regions of the world and at all levels of economic development. In addition to the bilateral open skies agreements, the United States has negotiated two multilateral open skies agreements: (1) the 2001 Multilateral Agreement on the Liberalization of International Air Transport (MALIAT) with New Zealand, Singapore, Brunei and Chile, later joined by Samoa, Tonga and Mongolia; and (2) the 2007 Air Services Agreement with the European Community and its 27 Member States. . . .